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It is a buzz worthy project. For the first time in Pembina Trails, beehives were placed on top of a school roof. The hands-on learning opportunity was made possible through a partnership with Beeproject Apiaries and one determined Henry G. Izatt teacher.

The idea started with the school planting a garden. Students and staff quickly began talking about sustainability and the importance of honeybees. Teacher, Tracey Matthews, researched, planned and actually took a beekeeper course, through the University of Manitoba, before the green light was given to welcome rooftop hives.

“I don’t even think there are words to describe how much these kids are learning and experiencing,” shared Matthews .They can go home, tell their parents, and say, 'yeah, we got honey off a hive, that was on a roof, that ate our flowers’. I think they will remember this for a long time.”

During the peak summer months, the hives had roughly 40-50 thousand bees. In September, the students had a chance to extract honey.

“It takes a lot of work to take care of the hives. It is super exciting as the honey is local and for all you know, it could be from the plants you have at your garden at home. It is really interesting,” said grade 9 student, Kristina Kerkelova.

In all 168 jars, more than 60 kilograms, of HGI honey was collected.  Kerkelova created the containers labels using the school’s logo of a paw print with a honeycomb shape twist. You can purchase a jar for $15 at the school’s office, 960 Scurfield Blvd. To make it an even sweeter deal, all funds raised go towards supporting this innovative project.

Sweet success for Henry G. Izatt bee project


It is a buzz worthy project. For the first time in Pembina Trails, beehives were placed on top of a school roof. The hands-on learning opportunity was made possible through a partnership with Beeproject Apiaries and one determined Henry G. Izatt teacher.

The idea started with the school planting a garden. Students and staff quickly began talking about sustainability and the importance of honeybees. Teacher, Tracey Matthews, researched, planned and actually took a beekeeper course, through the University of Manitoba, before the green light was given to welcome rooftop hives.

“I don’t even think there are words to describe how much these kids are learning and experiencing,” shared Matthews .They can go home, tell their parents, and say, 'yeah, we got honey off a hive, that was on a roof, that ate our flowers’. I think they will remember this for a long time.”

During the peak summer months, the hives had roughly 40-50 thousand bees. In September, the students had a chance to extract honey.

“It takes a lot of work to take care of the hives. It is super exciting as the honey is local and for all you know, it could be from the plants you have at your garden at home. It is really interesting,” said grade 9 student, Kristina Kerkelova.

In all 168 jars, more than 60 kilograms, of HGI honey was collected.  Kerkelova created the containers labels using the school’s logo of a paw print with a honeycomb shape twist. You can purchase a jar for $15 at the school’s office, 960 Scurfield Blvd. To make it an even sweeter deal, all funds raised go towards supporting this innovative project.

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