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March 22 was World Water Day, and students at General Byng School spent the week leading up to Spring Break learning about and celebrating water. 

The goal was to learn about the importance of water to all living things on Earth. Angela Fey, Indigenous student success teacher, shared some of the lessons and outcomes of the activities.

“[Students] studied ways we can hurt water by polluting or wasting clean fresh water and how we can help water by simply not wasting it,” she said. 


Lessons focused on how protecting a precious resource, like water, begins with a conversation and an action. They created posters to spread the word and started conversations at home about ways to save water. 

Students were quick to catch on. “Water is important because I can drink clean water when I am thirsty,” shares Andrew (Grade 4). Nylah (Grade 1), sees the need for action: “We need people to respect water.”

How do we show that respect? “We don’t waste water,” says Emberlee (Kindergarten).


Elder and Knowledge Keeper Alison Cox led the students in a water blessing, shared Anishinaabe water teachings and then led the way on a walk.  Students sang a water song and got their message out to the neighbourhood. 

That message as clear as healthy water should be:

“Water is important because without water nothing would live.” – Eli, Grade 2
“Water is sacred and water is life”. – Lianah, Kindergarten
“Water is life. If we didn't have it we would die.” – Kaynen, Grade 3

Learn more about World Water Day.

Spreading the word that water is life



March 22 was World Water Day, and students at General Byng School spent the week leading up to Spring Break learning about and celebrating water. 

The goal was to learn about the importance of water to all living things on Earth. Angela Fey, Indigenous student success teacher, shared some of the lessons and outcomes of the activities.

“[Students] studied ways we can hurt water by polluting or wasting clean fresh water and how we can help water by simply not wasting it,” she said. 


Lessons focused on how protecting a precious resource, like water, begins with a conversation and an action. They created posters to spread the word and started conversations at home about ways to save water. 

Students were quick to catch on. “Water is important because I can drink clean water when I am thirsty,” shares Andrew (Grade 4). Nylah (Grade 1), sees the need for action: “We need people to respect water.”

How do we show that respect? “We don’t waste water,” says Emberlee (Kindergarten).


Elder and Knowledge Keeper Alison Cox led the students in a water blessing, shared Anishinaabe water teachings and then led the way on a walk.  Students sang a water song and got their message out to the neighbourhood. 

That message as clear as healthy water should be:

“Water is important because without water nothing would live.” – Eli, Grade 2
“Water is sacred and water is life”. – Lianah, Kindergarten
“Water is life. If we didn't have it we would die.” – Kaynen, Grade 3

Learn more about World Water Day.

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